Info

Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing Podcast

Training and performance podcasts by Eric Hörst, the internationally renowned author, climbing coach, researcher, inventor, and accomplished climber of more than 40 years. Founder of TrainingForClimbing.com and PhysiVāntage. With his unique combination of veteran climbing and coaching experience and knowledge of the latest climbing research, Eric presents practical, effective guidelines to climb harder, reduce injury risk, and maximize the experience of moving over stone. Eric is one of the world's most knowledgeable climbing coaches and his eight books (and many foreign translations) have sold more than 400,000 copies worldwide. His latest book release is the 3rd edition of Training For Climbing. Learn more at: http://www.trainingforclimbing.com
RSS Feed
Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing Podcast
2021
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
January


2018
December
November
October
August
July
June
May
April
March
February


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
October
June
February


2015
June
April
March
January


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: Page 2
Nov 20, 2019

If you're serious about training and climbing your best, then you must be serious about performance nutrition. The foods you consume play a central role in energy production, training adaptations, muscle recovery, connective tissue health, and your strength-to-weight ratio. Combined, these nutritional influences are nearly as significant as the influence of your training program--and, if you get both your training and nutrition right, then a powerful synergy will elevate your performance to a new level!

RUNDOWN

00:40 – Intro to performance nutrition. Why it's important.

4:16 - As a guiding principle, climbers should "eat and train" not "diet and exercise."

5:19 - A short story about an aspiring elite climber...

6:40 - One of my favorite sayings...and a powerful guiding principle: "To outperform the masses you must do things they don't do."

7:00 - Pro tip: Eschew group think. Live by your own light. Build your own optimal system to reach your goals.

9:10 - Performance nutrition must be personalized. Many factors are at play...so it will take some effect to get it right.

15:45 - Nutrition is not a black & white topic. There are few "never eat" foods--enjoying rich foods is one of life's great pleasures.  Moderation and discipline are critical, however.

18:00 - Beware of the flood of training and nutrition articles on the Internet (and social media posts). Some have great info, but many contain training and nutrition "fake news".

20:15 - Climbing is a strength-to-weight and power-to-weight ratio sport. Therefore, bodyweight is a critical factor and it should be optimized via smart training and nutrition. Caloric restriction may be valuable leading up to periods of performance climbing or competition.

24:15 - Your training and nutrition must be shaped to match your goals. The guidance of a veteran trainer and climbing-knowledgable nutritionist can be invaluable.

26:30 - Definition of "high-quality weight loss" -- this is the goal for elite climbers wanting to maximize performance.

27:30 - How to best create a slight caloric deficit to optimize body composition before competition or performance climbing.

28:50 - High-quality protein is essential for maintaining muscle mass, strength, and power during periods of hard training and/or caloric restriction. The protein requirement is 1.2 to 1.6 grams/kg of body weight per day. Supplementary protein, ideally a high-quality whey isolate, is often necessary to meet this goal while restricting calories.

30:30 - The importance of Leucine, especially in your post-exercise feeding.

31: 08 - Carbohydrate backloading as a powerful performance nutrition and recovery strategy.

34:00 - The value of post-exercise and bedtime whey protein isolate and/or micellar casein. Vegans should consider a pea protein supplement powder.

34:30 - Eric weights in on "fad diets"...low carb, keto, paleo, high carb, etc.

36:00 - The importance of adequate carbohydrates for power and strength-endurance athletes such as climbers.

38:00 - Eric's recommended macronutrient ratio...approximately 60% carbohydrates, 20% protein, and 20% fat.

39:23 - Eric's pyramid paradigm for healthy eating for peak performance. A balanced diet is the pyramid base, while sport-specific nutrition and supplements form the pyramid top.

41:54 - Regarding sports supplements--if you're eating right, then you may get added benefits from certain supplements.

43:30 - Eric briefly mentions the company he founded--PhysiVantage makes the first research-based supplements for climbers.

44:16 - What supplements might work for climbers?

44:30 - Post-workout/post-climbing protein can jump start and accelerate muscle and connective tissue recovery.

45:00 - BCAAs may have some value in a performance setting, but as a regular training aid there could be unintended consequences that may compromise muscle quality and performance in the long run.

47:00 - The importance of increasing muscle quality and muscle efficiency over the long term--this is the pathway to stronger more powerful muscles without gaining weight.

50:00 - What about creatine for climbers? Micro-doses may benefit, but creatine "loading" will likely hurt performance.

53:40 - Anti-oxidants (e.g. vitamin C, E, selenium) will limit the hormetic response to training and potentially reduce desired training adaptations in the long run.

56:45 - Supplements to "prime" the aerobic energy system and increase oxygen kinetics have great promise. Beetroot extract and citrulline malate will likely enhance climbing performance and recovery between bouts of high-intensity exercise.

1:01:00 - What about caffeine?

1:02:30 - Anaerobic lactic system buffers, beta alanine and sodium bicarbonate, have some potential benefits.

1:06:10 - Is a daily multivitamin helpful? What about minerals?

1:07:00 - A chunk of dark chocolate eaten each day has health and performance value. Seriously!

1:08:30 - The benefits of vitamin-C-enriched hydrolyzed collagen for climbers. Supporting connective tissue health is essential for hard-training for climbers.

1:09:32 - A few supplements that don't work...

1:12:00 - Conclusion and closing comments of nutrition for climbers

1:13:00 - Do you value this free podcast? Please write a review, and please share with a friend.

SUPPORT ERIC'S CLIMBING BRANDS

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s TRAINING FOR CLIMBING YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

  • Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!
Oct 8, 2019

In a departure from my usual lecture style podcasts, I'm happy to feature a guest on this month's podcast--Dr. Tyler Nelson, a chiropractic physician and owner of Camp 4 Human Performance in Salt Lake City. This is my first podcast interview in about a decade--I believe my last audio interview was with Alex Honnold soon after his free solo of Half Dome (2008). Maybe some day I'll dig out that podcast from the audio vault and post it here! But I digress.

The focus of this podcast is Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) training. This training modality has been around for decades, but has only been recently popularized by some physiotherapists and coaches. Among climbers, perhaps no one is more knowledgable on this topic than Dr. Nelson. In this 40-minute interview we'll explore the different BFR training protocols, and how BFR training may be a beneficial intervention for injured and healthy climbers alike.

SUMMARY

  • History of BFR and introduction into training in the USA.
  • The difference between "passive" and "active" BFR.
  • Ischemic preconditioning with passive BFR--complete arterial occlusion for up to 5 minutes with no exercise or loading.
  • Keys for effective active BFR with intermittent loading:
  • 40% to 80% of arterial occlusion pressure--or a subjective cuff tightness of 7 out of 10.
  • Resistance/loading of 20% to 40% of 1RM.
  • Protocol: 30 reps with first set, then 3 more sets of 15 reps with 30 seconds of rest between each set.
  • Perform 3 or 4 exercises per BFR session with 30 to 60 seconds between exercises. Fatigue larger muscles first, then smaller muscles.
  • Use BFR once or twice per week as an adjunct to regular training (for healthy climbers); or do up to 6 days per week, alternating upper-body and lower-body days, in the case of rehab from injury.

BFR RESEARCH PAPERS:

ABOUT PHYSIVANTAGE:

  • I formed PhysiVantage to make research-based, athlete-tested performance nutrition for passionate climbers who place great demands on their bodies! Visit PhysiVantage.com and save 10% off non-sale items with the code “save10” at checkout.
  • Need more Power Endurance? Want faster recovery between boulders or at mid-route rests? Try out the research-based Endure X pre-workout/pre-performance drink mix.

Check out Eric’s TRAINING FOR CLIMBING YouTube channel.

Follow Eric and TFC on Facebook!

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

Facebook - @PhysiVantage

For a comprehensive study of Training for Climbing, check out the 3rd edition of Hörst's best-selling book!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Music by: Misty Murphy

  • Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!
Sep 4, 2019

This is fourth in a series on sinew training with a specific focus on climbing injuries and prevention. Incidence of climbing injuries is growing, and overuse injuries to the fingers, elbows, and shoulders are common among beginners and expert alike.

Eric lays out the perfect storm of factors that make upper extremity overuse injuries so common. You will learn countermeasures to reduce your injury risk and increase tendon health and finger flexor pulley strength.

If you engage in hard finger training, frequently push your physical limits, and/or occasionally experience tendon or joint pain, then this podcast will be game-changer for you!

RUNDOWN

0:24 – Intro to this episode and a quick recap of the previous episodes in this series. Be sure to listen to the first three podcasts in this series:

1:45 - Overuse injuries are incredibly common...almost every avid climber will experience tweaks (or worse) in their fingers, elbows, and/or shoulders. So the information covered in these podcasts is game-changing if you want to reduce injury risk and climb better.

3:20 - Eric introduces the three parts of this podcast...the 3 factors that combine to form a perfect storm for climbing injuries.

7:10 - Latest information from the Climbing Medicine Symposium in Squamish Canada in August.

10:24 - The latest data on types of climbing injuries and the injury trends over the last 20 years.

15:36 - A "Perfect Storm" brewing for climbing injuries. Understanding the storm will empower you to reduce injury risk and return from injury more quickly. There are 3 factors combining to build this storm.

17:00 - Perfect Storm Factor #1 - Climbing involves repetitive high-force loading on small body parts...including tiny tendons and ligaments in the fingers.

21:25 -Perfect Storm Factor #2 - Climbing is an addictive activities...and so we tend to climb a lot and rest too little. Furthermore, how your muscles feel (recover) isn't a good gauge of tendon recovery--we often climb again when our muscles feel recovered, yet the connective tissues take longer to recover from hard training/climbing. A vicious cycle of collagen breakdown in connective tissues begins...

33:10 -  Perfect Storm Factor #3 - Poor nutritional habits and/or undernourishment. Deficiency in collagen-specific amino acids (Glycine & proline) are at the heart of the matter--if you're deficient in these two amino acids, then you're not synthesizng collagen optimally...and you may be in a chronic state of net collagen degradation...and on the fast track to injury.

41:45 - Not all proteins are created equal..in fact, the amino acid profile of foods varies widely...and most non-animal products are low in glycine and proline.

44:00 - The importance of consuming enough glycine and proline during periods of physical and mental stress, injury, and illness. Consuming 7 - 10 grams of glycine per day is a wise goal for serious athletes.

46:30 - What foods and supplements are highest in glycine?

50:50 - Vegan sources of glycine.

52:00 - The most glycine-rich food on the planet? Gelatin...and the more refined version (more easily mixed and digested) is Hydrolyzed Collagen.

54:40 - The research that changed my life....and how it reveals that we can possibly double collagen synthesis in our tendons, pulleys, ligaments. This is revolutionary information for serious climbers!

58:00 - Learn about the specific coupled training-nutritional intervention shown to target glycine and profile from hydrolyzed collagen to a specific body part...your fingers...injured pulleys...elbows...shoulders...knees...whatever. This really works!

1:00:00 - Why it's ideal to consume hydrolyzed collagen on an empty stomach before finger training, climbing, or rehab. Also learn about Eric's 6-minute finger workout you can do every day.

1:02:00 - Tips for those wanting to rehab an injury as fast as possible.

1:03:00 - Learn about Supercharged Collagen and why this is the most advanced collagen protein on the market....and the only product designed from specifically for power athletes.

1:06:00 - 6 things you can do to AVOID the perfect storm!

1:18:40 - Final thoughts on the power of this information...and how it can change your climbing for the better for many years to come.

1:19:00 - Help spread the word...please SHARE with a friend and please WRITE a review.

ABOUT PHYSIVANTAGE:

  • I formed PhysiVantage to make research-based, athlete-tested supplements that will benefit passionate climbers who place great demands on their bodies! Visit PhysiVantage.com and save 10% off non-sale items with the code “save10” at checkout.
  • Need more Power Endurance? Want faster recovery during and between boulders or routes? Try out the research-based Endure X pre-workout/per-performance drink mix.

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

Facebook - @PhysiVantage

For a comprehensive study of Training for Climbing, check out the 3rd edition of Hörst's best-selling book!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s TRAINING FOR CLIMBING YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

  • Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!
Aug 6, 2019

In this episode of Ask Coach Hörst...Eric answers 7 wide-ranging questions from listeners. Some of the topics covered are...energy system training for alactic power, climbing-specific aerobic energy system training, Tabata training on a hangboard, advice for a beginner wanting to hangboard train, the pros/cons of Ketogenic diet, accelerating healing of an A2 pulley injury. Listen in!

Podcast Rundown

4:57 - Question #1 - How important is a climbing-specific aerobic training block at the beginning of a training cycle?

9:42 - Question #2 - Can you provide me with tips on staying healthy and motivated...and supporting my longevity in climbing?

16:12 - Question #3 - How many exercises can I include in an alactic energy system training session for developing maximum strength and power?

22:30 - Question #4 - I've read about the Tabata training protocol and I'm wondering what you think of applying it to hangboard training...by alternating 20-second hangs with 10 seconds of rest?

27:50 - Question #5 - I'm new to climbing and I feel that my weak fingers are a limiting constraint. Do you agree with the common rule of "no hangboard training in the first year of learning to climb"?

32:44  - Question #6 - I've been on a ketogenic diet for the past 3 weeks, and I feel terrific! What's your opinion the ketogenic diet and what are the pros and cons for a climber?

42:05 - Question #7 - I recently injured (mild pain) both of my middle fingers on a tweaky move. I've been doing light stretching and very light exercise to help support healing--what other things can I do to accelerate the healing process?

NOTE: If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment to the Ask Coach Horst post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, climbing ability level, and years climbing.

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

And on Instagram at: Training4Climbing

Jul 1, 2019

What makes great climbers great?

What are the distinct and rare character traits that make climbers like Tommy Caldwell, Alex Honnold, Margo Hayes, Adam Ondra, and Alex Megos (I call this group "CHHOM")--and others like them--the barrier-breaking and transcendent climbers that they are?

You might be thinking of things like "strong fingers", "low bodyfat, and "excellent sponsorship". Surely these are part of the equation, however, I believe the true Superpowers of these climbers are things you can't measure with a fitness test or financial summary.

In this podcast I present the 8 Superpowers of the very best climbers--traits you can develop (gradually) to achieve great success on the rock and in your everyday life. I hope you find this presentation enjoyable and empowering!

Rundown

0:58 - Introduction

2:50 - What does it take to turn an elite climber into one of the very best climbers on the planet?

8 Superpowers of the Very Best Climbers

5:28 - #1: Becoming comfortable with physical and mental discomfort.

11:53 - #2: Uncommon self-awareness and the willingness to embrace failures and personal weaknesses.

16:00 - #3: Effective goal setting and a habitual bias for action.

21:37 - #4: The power to sacrifice greatly.

27:00 - #5: Maintaining a beginner's mindset despite being a higherly praised elite climber.

34:56 - #6: The power to handle failure and overcome adversity.

38:30 - #7: The power to handle their "addiction".

45:44 - #8: The power NOT to care what other people think.

50:00 - Summary of the 8 Superpowers of the very best climbers.

51:15 - Do you have a #9 or #10 superpower to suggest? Leave your comment on Eric's T4C Twitter @Train4Climbing

52:15 - A brief word about Eric's new brand PhysiVāntage -- the first research-based, athlete-tested nutritional supplements for climbers! Get 15% off at PhysiVantage.com with the discount code PODCAST15 at checkout.

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

For a comprehensive study of Training for Climbing, check out the 3rd edition of Hörst's best-selling book!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s TRAINING FOR CLIMBING YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

  • Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!

 

Jun 6, 2019

Sinew training. What the heck is that?

Chances are you've never heard of "sinew training"...or even thought about it. After all, genetics and "luck" dictate the properties of our tendons and ligaments, right?

WRONG!

A growing body of recent research has shown that athletes can play an active role in developing stronger, higher performing tendons and ligaments by way of specific training and nutritional interventions. If you engage in hard finger training, frequently push your physical limits, and/or occasionally experience tendon or joint pain, then this podcast will be game-changer for you!

This podcast is the third in a series on sinew training. You will learn about the structure of connective tissues, and how you can intervene in your connective tissue health and function...and elevate your power and power-endurance in the process. It's exciting stuff!

Be sure to revisit the first two podcasts in this series episode #33 and episode #34, and don't miss the conclusion of this series in episode #37 coming in early July!

RUNDOWN

0:15 – Introduction to these ground-breaking podcasts on how you can play an active role in developing stronger, more robust and higher-performance tendons, ligament pulleys (A2 and such).

Be sure to listen to the first two podcasts in this series:

2:35 – Eric explains why connective tissue injuries are so common among climbers...

4:00 - Quick review of the new research on muscle and tendon adaptations....which dispell many of the old myths about tendons and ligaments.

9:00 - Eric outlines the 5 parts of this podcast...

12:30 - Part 1: Foundational information about the tendon, ligament, and muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) structure. It's all about proper collagen alignment, supporting net gains in collagen synthesis via adequate rest, and proper hydration. Factoid: gram for gram, collagen is stronger than steel!

26:00 - Part 2: Eric details the subtle, yet vitally important adaptations to training in tendon, ligament, and ECM. Learn the importance of--and differences--between strengthening and stiffening connective tissues. This is hugely important information for fine tuning your tendons for health and periods of performance climbing (or competition).

31:00 - Adaptation #1: Collagen synthesis. Important detail on collagen synthesis following training/climbing. Given adequete rest, a net gain in collagen molecules can result in a very gradual tendon hypertrophy. Factiod: The tendons of veteran climbers may be as much as 50% thicker than lesser experienced climbers.

36:00 - Adaptation #2: Enzymatic crosslinking...a more quick-developing adaptation that can increase connective tissue stiffness and performance. Although certain exercises protocols will actually reduce crosslinking and stiffness--some important distinctions here!

42:48 - Part 3: Learn about 6 confounding factors in collagen synthesis, crosslinking, and connective tissue health. You MUST know this information...and think critically about what factors may make you at greater risk for connective tissue injury...or slow recovery from training/climbing.

50:35 - Part 4: Training interventions for developing stronger, thicker tendons and annular (finger) tendon pulleys, stiffer more robust connective tissues, and how you can reduce stiffness and increase tendon health in the case of tendinopathy or other soft tissue injury. Get ready for a massive download of important information on specific training interventions and protocols for improve tendon/ligament strength....and increasing (or decreasing) connective tissue stiffness. Engaging in a highly personalized program is key!

1:07:08 - Part 5: The revolutionary research-derived nutritional intervention shown to increase collagen synthesis after targeted exercise. IMO, this is truly revolutionary information for power-endurance athletes such as rock climbers. The key is to consume vitamin C-enriched high-quality hydrolyzed collagen 30 to 60 minute BEFORE you engage in targeted exercise--only this way will the glycine and proline in the blood stream reach the synovial fluid and get drawn into the tendons and ligaments support up to a doubling of collage synthesis.

1:14:10 - How to spike glycine, proline, and vitamin C as you train your fingers? Consume Supercharged Collagen and follow the research-based training protocol and you may be able to double collagen synthesis after climbing-specific exercise. Available only from PhysiVāntage!

1:18:20 - Guidelines for proper Supercharged Collagen use and optimal benefit...and how to use it to support recovery from training and/or rehab of a connective tissue injury.

1:22:50 - Podcast wrap-up--PLEASE write and review and SHARE with your partners and friends.

IMPORTANT NOTES:

  • I formed PhysiVantage to make research-based supplements that will benefit passionate climbers who place great demands on their bodies! Visit PhysiVantage.com and save 15% off non-sale items with the code “podcast15” at checkout.
  • Info on three great events I’ll be appearing at this summer. Then 26th annual International Climbers Festival in Lander, WY (July 10 – 14, 2019). The Canada Strong Climbing coaches conference (August 6 – 9, 2019). Climbing Medicine Canada (August 12 – 14, 2019) in Squamish, BC.

Get 15% off at PhysiVantage.com with the discount code PODCAST15 at checkout.

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

Facebook - @PhysiVantage

For a comprehensive study of Training for Climbing, check out the 3rd edition of Hörst's best-selling book!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s TRAINING FOR CLIMBING YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

  • Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!
May 14, 2019

In this episode of Ask Coach Hörst...Eric answers 7 wide-ranging questions from listeners. Some of the interesting topics covered are...the science of "supercompensation", the use of gymnastic exercises in training, dealing with recurrent injuries, fingerboard training, mental training and "head space" development, endurance training, running, and more! It's 45 minutes of training-for-climbing information and fun. Listen in!

Podcast Rundown

4:48 - Question #1 - What exactly is "supercompensation" and how does the intensity and frequency of my training affect supercompensation and my strength and fitness gains?

14:45 - Question #2 - Are calisthenics and gymnastic exercises beneficial for climbers? If so, how can I best add them to my program?

20:35 - Question #3 - For the past two years I've been stuck in a cycle of injury including both of my elbows and one shoulder. I tend to be hyper mobile...so perhaps I'm just not meant to be a climber. What do you think Eric? Is there any hope for me to have an injury-free climbing season?

26:10 - Question #4 - I'm a veteran climber, with lots of alpine experience, but I consider myself rather weak (I can redpoint 5.12c).  I'm beginning a hangboard training program with weighted hangs and repeaters--can I do both of these in the same workout session or would that be counterproductive? Can you give me some advice on how to hangboard train effectively?

31:10 - Question #5 - I'm a 5.11 sport and gym climber, but I struggle at leading 5.9 trad (gear) routes...due to fear? How can I begin to "mental train" to improve my headspace for success on harder traditional climbs?

37:00 - Question #6 - I have climbed 5.14 and V10, yet on my recent (first) visit to the Red River Gorge I got totally spanked on the long steep endurance routes of a much lower grade? How can I better prepare for climbing at steep crags like at the Red River Gorge?

41:50 - Question #7 - I'm an avid boulderer with a background in cycling and running. Right now, I'm running for up to 45 minutes, a few days per week, because it makes me feel better and keep my weight in check for climbing. Is this amount of running hurting my recovery from climbing and training for climbing? When's the best time to do my runs--on climbing or on non-climbing days?

NOTE: If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment to the Ask Coach Horst post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, climbing ability level, and years climbing.

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

And on Instagram at: Training4Climbing

Apr 21, 2019

This may be the most important podcast you've heard in a long time...or, perhaps, ever!

If you engage in hard finger training, frequently push your physical limits, and/or occasionally experience tendon or joint pain...then this podcast could be a game-changer for you.

Traditionally, tendons and ligaments (such as the A2 pulleys of the fingers) have been viewed as inert structures that changed little after adolescence. We now know, however, that these connective tissues are dynamic and metabolically active. New studies provide clues as to how athletes can play an active role in developing stronger, more robust, and higher performance connective tissues. This is a revolutionary distinction for hard-training climbers...and it may change the way you train, eat, and recover going forward.

This podcast is the second in a series on sinew training for improved health and enhanced performance. Revisit podcast #33 for an introduction to the topic. Podcasts #34 and #35 will break much new ground on the topic of training for climbing--don't miss them!

RUNDOWN

0:15 – Introduction to this series of 4 podcasts on connective tissue training—this is revolutionary information.

2:07 – Question: What sport is as hard on tendons and ligaments as climbing? Is there one? Perhaps not. Consider that finger flexor tendon pulleys are just 1 to 2 mm thick, yet they have to carry a large percentage of a climber’s body weight.

4:00 – Collagen-based tissues carry the load, from muscle to fingertips, with every hold you grab…every move you make…every lunge you make!

6:30 – The best climber in the world isn’t the best if he’s injured. Injuries, big and small, are setbacks that change your trajectory.

7:35 – New paradigm: Your top priority in training for climbing: Develop stronger tendons, pulleys, and muscle matrix.

8:45 – Sinew have poor blood flow, and therefore may be poorly nourished.

9:30 – Key distinction: collagen breaks down with every intense work. Collagen synthesis takes 72 hours (or more) to remodel the connective tissue.

11:00 – Too much collagen breakdown and too little recovery time between workouts may lead to injury.

11:50 – Sinew gets much of their nutrition from fluid diffusion during mechanical loading (climbing and training). Therefore, consuming Supercharged Collagen 30 to 60 minutes training is the optimal nutritional protocol for supporting collagen synthesis in finger tendons and ligament pulleys.

15:30 – Anything you can do to promote collagen synthesis and connective tissue remodeling is a game-changer for a hard training climber. It’s with this goal in mind that I founded PhysiVantage.

16:30 – Learn about my new brand PhysiVāntage and our flagship product, Supercharged Collagen. This is a totally novel and premium produce.

19:40 – The genesis of PhysiVāntage—almost three years in the making. Here’s the back story.

22:00 – How decreasing collagen turnover after age 30 slows recovery and may increase the risk of injury.

25:50 – Most important amino acids for collagen synthesis are glycine, proline, hydroxyproline—these are hard to come by if you don’t consume a lot of meat.

27:30 – I created Supercharged Collagen to provide climbers with the perfect glycine and proline-rich pre-workout supplements for feeding their sinew the nutrients for optimal collagen synthesis. It’s research-based and athlete-tested.

32:00 – A quick research review. Here are six of the more than a dozen studies that I drew on in developing Supercharged Collagen.

41:20 – 6 questions and answers…

41:45 – Question #1: Will Supercharged Collagen fix my injury? (No, but it may enhance your rehabilitation program and, possibly, accelerate your return to climbing.)

43:20 – Question #2: How much Supercharged collagen should I consume each day? (One to three servings per day, depending on your situation.)

45:15 – Learn the benefits of doing a brief (15 minutes) “protective workout” each morning. This may be the biggest secret to building stronger tendons and ligaments in the long term!

47:40 – Question #3: What usage do I recommend for injured climbers? (First, see a doctor for a correct diagnosis. Second, research indicates that a 15 to 20 gram serving, 30 to 60 minutes before exercise, is ideal for supporting injury rehab.)

49:20 – Question #4: Can I consume Supercharged Collagen post-workout as a protein source for muscles. (Yes! But consuming a high-quality Whey protein is just as good for muscle recovery.)

50:35 – Question #5: Is there a vegan version of Supercharged Collagen? (No, there’s no such thing as vegan hydrolyzed collagen.)

52:08 – Question #6: How long does it take to feel the beneficial effects of Supercharged Collagen? (It’s unlikely you’ll feel much difference in your sinew short-term, however, multiple studies have shown a statistically significant reduction in joint pain from several months of collagen peptide use.)

55:00 – I formed PhysiVantage to my difference-making supplements for passionate climbers who place great demands on their bodies! Visit PhysiVantage.com and save 15% off non-sale items with the code “podcast15” at checkout.

56:40 – Info on three great events I’ll be appearing at this summer. Then 26th annual International Climbers Festival in Lander, WY (July 10 – 14, 2019). The Canada Strong Climbing coaches conference (August 6 – 9, 2019). Climbing Medicine Canada (August 12 – 14, 2019) in Squamish, BC.

59:25 – If you enjoyed this podcast—please SHARE it with your friends and on your social media, and consider writing a review on iTunes.

Get 15% off at PhysiVantage.com with the discount code PODCAST15 at checkout.

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

Facebook - @PhysiVantage

For a comprehensive study of Training for Climbing, check out the 3rd edition of Hörst's best-selling book!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

  • Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!
Apr 1, 2019

Get ready for some breakthrough research-based information that, I believe, is revolutionary for hard-training climbers!

The topic is sinew training—that is, new training and nutritional interventions shown to promote tendon, ligament, and muscle matrix strength and health. We all know how hard climbing (and training) is on the flexor tendons and ligament pulleys of the fingers, as well as the elbows and shoulders; so what could be more valuable to climbers than strategies to improve sinew health, strength, and performance?

This is an information-rich podcast that might require a couple of listens...to determine how you can best apply and benefit from this new material. The next three podcasts will expand on this topic with details on specific training interventions for strengthening (and rehabbing) sore or tweaked tendons and pulleys. If you are a proactive, early adapter kind of person, then this is cutting-edge information I'm sure you'll be all over...like chalk on a crux hold!

A final note: If you enjoy this podcast, then please share it with a friend, post to social media, or write a review. Thank you!

Rundown

1:00 – Introduction to a new series of podcasts on sinew training—how to develop stronger, stiffer, healthier tendons and ligaments. This is the first of four episodes in the series…breaking new ground that I feel is revolutionary for climbers.

3:00 – Tendons and ligaments are not inert—they change and adapt to training in adulthood, but at a much slower rate than muscles do. And, sinew training requires unique training modalities and nutritional interventions. PhysiVāntage

5:20 – A quick rundown of the next 3 episodes in this series….and the exciting ground I’ll be covering.

7:00 – Eric gives a brief introduction of himself and his background for new listeners. Additional comments of recent advances in training for climbing.

10:10 – A reflection on last year’s series of podcasts on Energy System Training—powerful material for intermediate, advanced, and elite climbers. If you haven’t already, listen to these podcasts! # ???

13:00 – Introduction to sinew training…and the exciting new sport science I’m bringing to the climbing world in this series of podcasts.

15:30 – The importance of training to avoid injury and stay healthy, so that you can reach your goals! There’s a huge cost to injuries…lost seasons, missed competitions, setbacks and lost seasons.

20:00 – There are decades of knowledge gathered and distributed on muscle training and adaptations…but until recently there’s little research and scant instruction on sinew training.

23:00 – The importance of staying curious! Embracing and applying the latest research is key to progress and breakthroughs in most complex fields/endeavors.

28:00 – Three findings of my two years of research into sinew health and sinew training.

28:30 – Finding #1: Sinew is plastic. Tendons, ligaments, and extracellular muscle matrix change, adapt, and remodel very slowly…and you can play a role in this process!

34:00 – Distinct training and nutritional interventions do influence sinew health, strength, and performance.

35:00 – Finding #2: Tendons can hypertrophy. In certain situations, chronic mechanical loading can lead to slightly hypertrophy over years of exercise. Research has documented that the finger flexor tendons of veteran climbers are up to 50% thicker than non-climbers.

39:00 – Hypertrophy results from long-term training stimulus that slightly degrades collagen…followed by a rise in collagen synthesis during a recovery period of 48 to 72 hours. This cyclic process will gradually build stronger connective tissues given appropriate mechanical loading and rest periods. Nutrition plays an important role in the process, too—more on this in a bit!

41:35 – Sinew has poor blood flow compared to muscles…and there’s scant blood flow to sinew after training.

44:45 – Homeostasis perturbation from long-term overtraining (under-resting and perhaps poor nutrition) leads to disorganized and damaged collagen fibrils…that may be the root cause of the sudden “surprise” finger pulley tweak or onset of painful tendons in the elbows and shoulders.

48:15 – Finding #3: There is a proven nutritional intervention that increases collagen synthesis in connective tissues…and can support sinew recovery and strengthening. Research by Keith Baar and Greg Shaw has shown a doubling of collagen synthesis with vitamin C enriched hydrolyzed collagen consumed 30 to 60 minutes before exercise.

55:30 – Why nutrients consumed after exercise aren’t as effective for nourishing tendons. Synovial fluid diffusion during mechanical loading is the primary method of nourishment to sinew—thus, consuming a glycine and proline rich food before training is the best method of “feeding” sinew.

59:20 – My morning ritual for optimally feeding the tendon and ligaments of my fingers, arms and shoulders—15 minutes to stronger tendons. Supercharged Collagen works!

1:03:00 – You are playing a role in your tendon health…every day! Cease the opportunity to play an active role in the process.

1:04:10 – Introducing PhysiVāntage!  Our flagship product is Supercharged Collagen. Based on the research of Drs. Baar and Shaw, this is the most advanced tendon and ligament support supplement on the market. Use it daily to get a PhysiVantage!

Get 10% off at PhysiVantage.com with the discount code SAVE10 at checkout.

Instagram - @PhysiVantage

Facebook - @PhysiVantage

For a comprehensive study of Training for Climbing, check out the 3rd edition of Hörst's best-selling book!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Stitcher and  Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!

Jan 10, 2019

New Year's is a great time to think deeply about your goals, re-evaluate your course and strategy, and perhaps even reinvent yourself! Taking your performance to the next level—in climbing or anything—demands CHANGE, courage and commitment, and consistent goal-focused action. In this episode, Eric takes you through a series of thought-provoking exercises and, along the way, he will arm you with powerful techniques and tips to make massive progress toward your climbing and non-climbing goals!

Rundown

0:15 – Introduction and New Year’s best wishes!

1:30 – “Climbing performance” and “human performance” are the same thing…so this episode will be wide-ranging.

2:25 – Setting goals isn’t enough—you need a SYSTEM to get you to your goals.

3:15 – This podcast has 5 parts, each with a drill down into a topic that will improve your performance in climbing and beyond.

5:23 – PART 1: Decide that CHANGE is a must! Improving at climbing—or anything—comes no other way.

8:10 – Exercise (pause the podcast): Write down your top 5 to 10 high-value goals/endeavors. Climbing can be one item, but write down your other important life goals (in the next 3 to 10 years).

9:45 – Exercise: Rank your goals in order of importance. Now divide your list into three tiers—the top tier (2 or 3 items) defines your MISSION!

12:50 – Exercise: Now write down 1 or 2 things that MUST give up or change in order to liberate yourself to achieve greatly. What person, activity, or thing is weighing you down…making you miserable and/or consuming your time?

14:45 – Learn how to create massive leverage for change...and supercharge your motivation and progress toward your goals!

17:15 – PART 2: Build Stronger Mental Muscle. Essential for progress, since all performance begins with your thoughts.

18:45 – What we can learn from pro climbers…most of whom exhibit incredible mental muscle, day in and day out.

20:30 – Learn about Eric’s “CHHOM gang” of climbers. What is CHHOM? Who are CHHOM? Strive to be like CHHOM!

22:00 – 4 mental training tips and techniques…

23:20 – a.) Supercharge your visualization.

27:25 – b.) Take control of your self-talk. Keep it 90%+ positive!

31:00 – c.) Act the part. Your posture, facial expression, and attitude create an aura that brings magical energy and synchronicity to you!

33:09 – d.) Surround yourself with positive, goal-oriented, successful people. Also, bathe your mind with positive media, books, images, etc.

35:49 – Side note: Eric’s most powerful book—bet you haven’t read it yet, but you should—is called Maximum Climbing: Mental Training for Peak Performance. A must-read for every serious climber!

36:35 – PART 3: Learn how to Optimize Your Training Program

37:20 – The best training program for you…is one you’re not doing!

38:30 – Advice for Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced climbers.

40:05 – Access to new technology, the latest sports-science, and novel training techniques is essential for Elite climbers to improve.

41:45 – The difference between “copycat” training and “modeling”—the former is bad, the latter is good!

42: 28 – Access to a good veteran coach is extremely helpful…but you can study and learn to be an effective self-coach.

43:45 – PART 4: Simplify your training—simplify your life! Learn how to apply the 80-20 Rule to improve your effectiveness and advance more quickly toward your goals.

45:05 – Eric reveals one of his weaknesses…and his decade-long battle of passions!

49:05 – Eliminate trivial pursuits, trolls, critics, and naysayers...and you’ll be happier and more effective—just like CHHOM!

50:36 – Learn how to use Pareto's Principle ("the 80-20 Rule") to act more effectively in climbing, training, and other important life aspects.

53:10 – Eric comments on the advantages of occasional two-a-day training for advanced/elite climbers.

54:55 – PART 5: Strong shoulders beget strong finger! Make this a mantra in developing your finger training program.

57:50 – Your fingers are only be as strong as your brain allows! A strong, stable foundation (rotator cuff and scapular stabilizer muscles) is essential for high-end finger training.

1:00:50 – Horst principle: “Develop stability before strength, and strength before power.” This conceptual model will support long-term strength gains and reduce risk. Eric's book Training For Climbing (3rd edition) has a fully chapter (Ch. 6) on exercises for developing comprehensive shoulder stabilizer strength.

1:02:50 – Summary comments about seeing the big picture for motivation and guidance, but narrowing your daily focus on important steps you can take toward your goal. Making meaningful progress towards a goal is the simplest, yet richest source of happiness.

1:05:55 – Check out Eric’s T4C Youtube channel for a short video on how to increase your effectiveness—and accelerate movement towards your goals—in any important life area.

If you enjoyed this podcast, PLEASE SHARE it with your friends via Social Media or an embed on your climbing blog. And please write an iTunes review. Thank you!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!

Dec 7, 2018

This episode provides critical framework and guidelines for effective hangboard training. Based on 30+ years of hangboard training experience--and the latest research--you'll learn the importance of a proper warm up, why you must train different finger grip positions, how to maintain forearm muscle balance and lower injury risk, as well as valuable tips on organizing your hangboard training for optimal results and continued gains in the long-term!

Rundown

0:22 - Introduction

2:00 - Detailed description of the new ULTIMATE BOARD, designed by Hörst and manufactured by Nicros. Purchase here >>

11:20 - Who should hangboard train? Guidelines for beginner, intermediate, advanced, and elite climbers.

17:30 - The value of hangboard training for intermittent year-round...and the importance of finding your "best" personalized program.

18:45 - Get compliant! Learn the "120-move" rule for warming up.

24:45 - Why elite level climbers need to do some two-a-day workouts.

25:55 - Beginner guidelines. To hang or not to hang?

26:35 - How proper training (and rest) can make your tendons stronger, stiffer, and slightly thicker given long-term, prudent hangboard training.

27:10 - Which grip positions you should train? How grip position effects forces placed on the flexor tendons and pulleys. Important stuff!

30:00 - Biomechanics of the full crimp grip.

31:12 - Biomechanics of the open-hand grip.

32:18 - What about the "open-crimp" grip?

34:15 - Importance of targeting a specific grip position.

35:50 - Research findings on the forces places on the FDP and FDS flexor tendons with different grip positions.

40:50 - Forces placed on A2 and A4 pulleys...and how to train around a minor annular pulley injury.

42:32 - Finger extensor muscle imbalances...and how to train to combat them.

48:45 - Pinch grip training--Eric's "two birds with one stone" training recommendation.

51:08 - Why every serious climbing much do two brief antagonist exercise sessions per week.

51:55 - Reminder that specific hangboard training protocols are detailed in Podcast #10.

54:08 - Tips on exercise programming.

55:50 - Tips for advanced climbers.

57:00 - Elite climber advice: The importance of doing periods of high volume training for Central Governor recalibration--one of the keys to breaking new performance barriers! Learn more on this in my book, Training for Climbing.

59:30 - Keys to long-term gains over decades. Yes, you can do it with dedicated & smart training--if you stay uninjured!

1:00:35 - Teaser on the next few podcasts...which will break some new ground. Don't miss them!

1:01:40 - Closing comments about the transcending spirit of climbing...and Eric's good wishes to you for the holidays and New Year!

If you enjoy this podcast, PLEASE SHARE it with your friends via Social Media or an embed on your climbing blog. Thank you!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!

Photo: Training on the Ultimate Board, available from NICROS.com

Nov 3, 2018

0:25 – Preview of this and upcoming podcasts.

5:55 - Overview of this summer's International Rock Climbing Researchers Association 4th Congress in Chamonix, France.

10:40 - Research highlight #1: 3-D motion analysis of speed climbing performance, and interpretation of hip mechanical energy in official speed climbing route. (Lionel Reveret - France).

14:45 - Research highlight #2: Effect of climbing hold depth on biomechanical arm action during pull-ups. (Laurent Vigouroux - France)

22:55 - Research highlight #3: PIP joint contact incongruency in different grip positions as a trigger for epiphyseal fatigue fracture in adolescent climbers. (Andreas Schweizer - Switzerland)

31:20 - Research highlights #4 & 5: Association between different Rate of Force Development-measurements and climbing performance (Vegard Vereide - Norway),  and the Rate of Force Development: a new biomechanical key factor in climbing (Guillaume Levernier - France).

40:45 - Research highlight #6: The effects of weighted dead-hang training program on grip strength and endurance in experienced climbers with different levels of strength (Eva Lopez-Rivera - Spain).

52:52 - Research highlight #7: Qualitative analysis of two of 2017's greatest ascents and a proposed conceptual model for maximum-difficulty sport climbing and energy system requirements (Eric Hörst - USA)

1:05:08 - The ultimate lesson from Hayes' and Ondra's ascentsclimb quickly, accurately, and efficiently, and pause to rest only at effective rest positions. In short, the Hörst rule for lead climbing peak performance: Climb fast and rest well!

1:07:24 - My shout out to a few of the numerous coaches now bringing climbing science to their work as trainers!

If you enjoy this podcast, PLEASE SHARE it with your friends via Social Media or an embed on your climbing blog. Thank you!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!

Photo: Eric Hörst presenting at the IRCRA conference in Chamonix, France, July 2018.

Oct 2, 2018

In this episode of Ask Coach Hörst...Eric answers 7 wide-ranging questions from listeners, including in-depth coverage of effective hangboard training, the importance of developing a climbing "talent stack", details on Threshold training for climbing-specific aerobic development, training while recovering from a lower-leg injury, training for middle-aged climbers, and more!

Podcast Rundown

1:35 - Question #1 - A two-part question on effective hangboard training...with a long, detailed answer offering rich guidance on developing strength and endurance using a hangboard. Part 1: Is it better to train on small edges with body weight or larger holds with added weight? Part 2: How does the length of rest between hangboard reps and sets effect the training adaptation?

19:15 - Question #2 - How can I find the proper training intensity when doing Threshold Intervals…to best develop my climbing-specific aerobic energy system? Consider listening to podcast #26 for a complete study of aerobic system training for climbing.

26:20 - Question #3 - I'm out of climbing for several months due to lower leg surgery...so, Eric, what kind of training do you suggest for me during this forced withdrawal from climbing?

32:37 - Question #4 - Why don't you recommend any low-rep hypertrophy training for antagonist and core muscles?

38:01 - Question #5 - I get so incredibly pump—and quickly!—on steep routes. How can I assess my energy systems and determine which energy system (Aerobic or Anaerobic) I need to train? Can you give me some training advice? For a super detailed study of anaerobic lactic training, listen to podcasts #23 and #24.

44:32 - Question #6 - Climbing is now my passion, however I previously was a serious rugby player. How might I train to reduce the size (weight) of my rather large leg muscle? Eric also explains the importance of developing a climbing “talent stack”.

51:55 - Question #7 - I'm 47 years old (been climbing 28 years) and very experienced at hard multi-pitch routes...but I have also climbed 5.13a sport and V7 boulders. My goal is to climb some multi-pitch 5.12 routes, and I'd like to improve my physical fitness. What training do you recommend for someone my age?

NOTE: If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment to the Ask Coach Horst post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, climbing ability level, and years climbing.

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

And on Instagram at: Training4Climbing

Aug 28, 2018

This is the fifth and final episode in our study of Energy System Training theory and application. In this 90-minute tour de force, Eric presents the art of the science via 8 key ideas and distinctions to make your energy system training optimally effective. This is powerful material—understanding and applying this cutting-edge sports science will empower you to elevate your training outcomes...and climb harder!

Podcast Rundown

2:50 – Recap of the genesis of my study of energy systems more than 5 years ago. After a two-year review of the latest research and sports science, I discovered that some aspect of the old school sports science—and even some physiology textbooks—were outdated and even wrong on some important details. Therefore, what I’m trying to do with my book Training for Climbing and these podcasts is apply the latest sports science, research, and training technology to climbing. Only this way will we optimize training programs and advance the sport!

5:20 – What I’m presenting in this series of 5 podcasts is the cutting edge of training for climbing…that may open the door to 5.16a in the next 5 to 10 years...and help the mass of climbers achieve their climbing goals and beyond!

8:15 – Eric shares a brief anecdote from his week at the International Rock Climbing Researchers congress in Chamonix, France...about meeting the Japan National Climbing Team head coach Hiroshi Yasui.

10:58 – The focus of this podcast is the art of the science…via 8 key ideas and distinctions to make energy system training optimally effective. This is important and powerful summary material that will pull together the key concepts from the 4 previous podcasts…and empower you to get the most out of your training both in the short and long term.

13:08 – How advanced training is like playing 3-D chess.

14:20 – Key Idea #1: Though we talk about (and train) them separately, all 3 energy systems contribute toward power in almost every climbing move and training exercise. It's vitally important to understand how the three energy pathways influence, support, and even inhibit each other.

17:10 – Key Idea #2: Effective energy system training must target a specific pathway as much as possible. To optimally trigger training adaptations, the goal is to maximize the flux through a single energy pathway. You can’t train intuitively…or go to the gym and “just climb”—this approach is too imprecise for an advanced climber to make meaning gains.

21:30 – Key Idea #3: Working on your project is not effective energy system training. Listen and learn why…

24:55 – A quick side story about Alex Megos working on the "Bibliography" project at Céüse…quite possibly a 9c/5.15d route.

27:54 - Key Idea #4: Energy system training for short-term adaptations and long-term gains are two very different things. While the former may help you send your current project, it's a commitment to the latter that will help you reach your genetic potential.

31:54 – Learn the secrets to long-term gains—which energy system(s) will advance your climbing…and what novel training adaptations you are after. This is brand new material to the climbing world—listen closely! (I first introduced this cutting-edge sport science in the first energy system training podcast in March 2018.)

36:40 – A brief, but important tangent on long-term development and mastery. As exemplified by Chris Sharma and Tommy Caldwell, you too can build-up strength, power, and endurance for 15 or 20 years (perhaps longer)….if you stay uninjured!

43:00 – Key Idea #5: Genetics do play a roll in determining your training gains and absolute climbing potential. Like it or not, genetics does play a role in training adaptations and how hard you may someday climb. That said, you can exert significant influence over your gene expression via the epigenetic effects of your day-to-day diet, training, and lifestyle. Energy System Training is one way to exert influence over your genes!

54:06 – Key Idea #6: A two-a-day workout schedule can be very beneficial for advanced/elite climbers, but the two sessions should be separated by 6 to 8 hours to optimize workout quality and minimize interference (of adaptation signaling). Intense strength/power workouts are best done in the afternoon or evening, so other forms of training—aerobic climbing, generalized aerobic activity, and similar—are best done early in the day (based on science). Of course, everyone is different (genetics, time available, other life issues)...and so your "best schedule" might require a different approach. #Nuance

1:00:30 – Bonus tip: Reduce or eliminate your antagonist training during your climbing performance season. Learn why this will help a well-trained, non-injured climber perform a bit better.

1:03:00 – Key Idea #7: You can learn and benefit a lot by keeping records of your workouts, subjective feelings, key performance indicators, and your climbing achievements. Digital and other online records, like 8a.nu and Vertical-Life.info, are a good place to start; but written records have great value, too. Learn why.

1:06:35 – Key Idea #8: Energy system programming is the ultimate "art of the science". Getting long term results requires a knowledgable coach, accurate testing, and progression program design that is artfully crafted around periods of performance climbing and/or competition. Personalized training is essential—nuance is key.

1:08:47 – Eric offers training program advice for beginners.

1:11:55 – Some programming tips for intermediate/accomplished climbers.

1:14:45 – Short- and long-term training program advice for advanced weekend warriors and professional/elite climbers.

1:22:27 – Summary comments about energy system training and the future of training for climbing. How high quality information and coaching is like a power tool that, through leverage, multiplies your current strength, talent, and climbing ability. Seek out the best information and coaches available—and become the best climber you can be!

1:24:00 - My thoughts on how becoming a better climber can make you a better human being...and empower you to positively impact other people (and perhaps change the world!) in small, but meaningful ways.

PLEASE SHARE THIS PODCAST with your friends via Social Media or an embed on your climbing blog. Thank you!

  • For more on energy system training (and a myriad other training tips and techniques) pick up a copy of the latest edition of the best-selling Training for Climbing.

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Subscribe on iTunes (or other podcast player) to "Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing" podcast. You can also listen to the T4C podcast on Spotify! Please write a review on iTunes!

Photo: Cameron Horst lowering after the send at Tetto di Sarre, Italy.

Jul 28, 2018

Welcome to Round #3 of "Ask Coach Hörst"...where I will answer 6 listener questions that I believe you will find interesting and informative. This episode covers wide-ranging topics from the pros/cons of calorie restriction vs. surplus, the possible unintended consequences of a vegan diet or vegetarianism, training while on business trips, training during long spells between climbing trips, the type of training program that's best for an intermediate (~5.10 climber), and more!

4:58 - Question #1 - How can I train effectively given my business travel (as a pilot) that typically lasts 8 days...followed by 6 days at home?

12:28 - Question #2 - My girlfriend and I are avid climbers of 5.10 ability...and we're wondering what the best training program is for us to progress into the higher grades?

17:54 - Question #3 - My outdoor "climbing season" comes down to a 2-week trips in the summer and winter. How can I best train as an indoor climber during the 5+ months between trips? Also, given my schedule, how often should I train the anaerobic lactic energy system?

24:18 - Question #4 - I seem to have reached a plateau at my current ability level of V8 boulders and 5.12d (sport climbs)...and I'm wonder which of your books would be best to guide me in training effectively for further improvement?

28:44 - Question #5 - I struggle with undercling and side-pull moves on steep terrain. How can I train to improve on these moves?

34:09 - Question #6 - I have a 3-part question relating to diet and specifically my vegan diet. 

  1. Is there an advantage to consuming a calorie surplus while training?
  2. [42:00] As a hard-training climber (V10/5.13+), what are the possible cons of being a vegetarian or vegan?
  3. [46:50] How much difference does a few pounds of bodyweight make in climbing performance?

 

NOTE: If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment to the Ask Coach Horst post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, climbing ability level, and years climbing.

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

And on Instagram at: Training4Climbing

Jun 21, 2018

This is the fourth in a series on using bioenergetic energy systems  as a guiding model to train more effectively. This epic 90-minute episode breaks down the nuance of properly training both the climbing-specific and generalized aerobic energy system—a critical and often-overlooked metabolic pathway that contributes significantly to power production in climbing and, importantly, drives most of the recovery process between moves, crux sequences, climbing, and even boulder problems. There's lots of gold to mine from this podcast, especially for already highly training intermediate to elite climbers.

Podcast Rundown

00:15 – Eric’s Intro to training the aerobic energy system…and its high importance to rock climbers. How the energy system conceptual model can empower you to train smarter and get more out of your training investment.

4:45 – If you think these podcasts are gold, then why not share it with your friends….and please leave a review on iTunes!

5:15 – All about the aerobic energy system and how it differs from the other two energy systems. Of course, all three energy systems contribute to ATP production, but there are certain climbing situations that call heavily on the aerobic energy system.

9:15 – A quick review of the three energy systems, when each dominates, and how the aerobic system comes into play for climbers. Learn why and when the anaerobic energy systems power down and eventually fail you…and how the aerobic energy system can only provide a sustained “critical power” of only about one-third of your peak power.

15:35 – How the aerobic energy system supports the ATP-CP energy system. Important stuff, especially for rope climbers…but really for all climbers.

18:20 – How the aerobic system supports the anaerobic lactic energy system. Yes, a stronger aerobic system can help you control the “pump”; but it’s also important that you strive to improve climbing economy and reduce the ATP cost of a given move or sequence—this is a hugely powerful distinction!

21:55 – A quick reminder on the importance of increasing maximum strength and power, season over season, because this sets the ceiling for your peak power output and anaerobic capacity.

23:50 – A detail discussion of the bioenergetics of finger flexor muscles and how finger grip intensity determines the energy system most used. Occlusion of blood flow is the critical factor, and maintaining blood flow as much as possible is one of the secrets of elite climbers.

28:45 – The physical prowess of Adam Ondra is both his large anaerobic reserve (capacity) AND high aerobic power!

30:35 – What climbing researchers have measured in the lab with regarding to the bioenergetics of climbing. (A truly climbing-specific VO2 test has yet to be developed and validated for testing at the gym.)  The importance of not conflating generalized aerobic fitness (and VO2) with climbing-specific aerobic development (and VO2).

32:34 – Moving from theory to practice…here we begin to look into targeted training of the finger flexors and pulling muscles (the rock climbing agonists).

34:09 - What adaptations take places in the climbing muscles that improve aerobic power? Adaptation #1 in an increase in capillary density which results in a decrease in diffusion distance—importantly, this contributes to increasing O2 kinetics. Simon Fryer’s research showed that elite climbers have higher O2 kinetics than lesser climbers.

37:50 – Adaptation #2 is an increase in aerobic enzymes…which can upregulate in just a matter of days to a week or two of aerobic-centric training/climbing.

40:15 – Adaptation #3 is mitochondria adaptations—critical for long-term development year over year…and for maintaining climbing-specific VO2 into middle age and beyond.

43:30 – Important point: Intracellular acidosis negatively impacts mitochondria function. This explains why a vicious flash pump (due to a poor warm up) can hurt same-day climbing performance…and why chronic acidosis (too much time spent anaerobic lactic training/climbing per week) can decrease aerobic power and contribute toward onset of overtraining syndrome.

45:15 – The difference between “aerobic power” and “aerobic capacity”. Which matters more for you?

47:10 – Exercises for developing aerobic power and capacity for climbers...

48:32 – ARC climbing. This involves easy, long, very submaximal (3 or 4 number grades below your limit) climbing for 30 to 60 minutes. It must be fairly low in intensity with no complete occlusion of forearm blood flow—you mustn’t succumb to the “pump lust”. Learn the pros and cons of ARC training.

53:10 – Threshold Intervals—perhaps the best approach to aerobic development for the mass of climbers. Unfortunately, getting the intensity right can be difficult—it can’t be too hard (too anaerobic) or too easy (too far below the aerobic threshold). For most people the target intensity is an 8 out of 10 as the end-of-set physical intensity and perceived exertion. A light pump and small increase in breathing rate is fine, but not a deep pump or heavy breathing (which signals anaerobic metabolism dominates).

59:36 – Alactic-aerobic intervals. For elite climbers, this is a go-to strategy for increasing aerobic power for high-level bouldering and sport climbing. This is NOT a training method for beginner or intermediate climbers, however, because it requires a high base level of strength and power. This is a tricky exercise protocol to get right—nuance, self-awareness, and discipline are essential to do it right and get the desired training adaptations. Listen closely for the critical details!

1:09:48 – How to train the climbing-specific aerobic system if you don’t have access to a climbing wall. Here, I describe two exercises using a hangboard or campus board: “moving hangs” and “low-intensity repeaters”. As with the previous exercises, getting the training nuance right is essential to gain aerobic system adaptations—specifically, your finger grip force must be only 20% - 30% of maximum so as to not completely occlude blood flow and go deeply anaerobic.

1:13:20 – A quick look at generalized aerobic training…running, bicycling, rowing, swimming, trail running, etc.

1:15:00 – What climbing researchers have determined with regarding to the VO2 max of climbers…and the need and benefits of generalized aerobic fitness and training.

 1:18:00 - Does generalized aerobic training really help performance? Might it hurt climbing performance? Is it a priority or a secondary need? How often should you do it? Learn all these details and more here!

1:23:20 – What days and time of days should you do your aerobic training? Tips and tricks for getting the most out of your aerobic system training…and how to integrate it with your other training for best results.

1:26:16 – Wrap up, closing comments, and final tips on energy system training. This stuff IS the future of training for climbing!

1:27:10 – Comments about the International Rock Climbing Researchers Association (IRCRA) meeting in Chamonix, France where I’ll speaking in July…and Eric’s closing comments.

PLEASE SHARE THIS PODCAST with your friends via Social Media or an embed on your climbing blog. Thank you!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Photo: Andy Raether on the first ascent of Manphibian (5.14d), Mt. Charleston, NV. Courtesy of Lacey Jones.

Jun 1, 2018

Welcome to the second round of "Ask Coach Hörst"...where I answer 10 listener questions. This episode covers vast terrain from fingerboard training to climbing nutrition to youth training to elbow tendonosis and more! Each question & answer runs about 5 minutes.

1:12 - Question #1 - When fingerboard training with weighted hangs...what's the weight-added difference when doing 10" x 1 max-weight hangs compared with doing the 7"/53" x 3 protocol?

5:17 - Question #2 - Is training individual fingers by suspending a light  free weight from a sling a useful technique?

10:40 - Question #3 - What days should I do supplemental training if climbing four days per week (combined outside and indoors)?

14:47 - Question #4 - Belaying and rehab advice for recovering for a climber returning from a broken wrist?

17:37 - Question #5 - Training recommendations for a 50-something climber with extensive background in weight lifting and running?

26:30 - Question #6 - Advice on dealing with...and hopefully recovering from medial elbow tendinopathy?

31:00 - Question #7 - My anaerobic endurance (power output) drops sharply at 40 to 45 seconds into hard, sustained climbing--how can I train to improve my anaerobic capacity?

37:51 - Question #8 - Can you recommend some pre-workout foods and give advice on what to eat at the crags? Also, how much protein should I eat each day?

44:20 - Question #9 - Mother asks Eric's training advice for her 12-year-old daughter...a nationally-ranked boulderer. What's the best training approach?

49:35 - Question #10 - How to organize training when you have a hangboard at home, but your access to a training/bouldering wall is at a gym without a hangboard?

52:10 - Wrap up...How YOU can submit a question for the next episode of "Ask Coach Horst". Visit my Twitter @Train4Climbing and leave a comment to the pinned "Ask Coach Horst" podcast.

NOTE: I'll record the next episode of Ask Coach Horst in late July for release in early August. If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment to the Ask Coach Horst post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, and years climbing.

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

And on Instagram at: Training4Climbing

May 11, 2018

This is the third in a four-part series on energy system training as a conceptual model for organizing your workouts for improved training results and climbing performance. This episode is the conclusion of podcast #23 (on training the Anaerobic Lactic energy system) and it details specific training protocols for improving short, intermediate, and long power endurance. Combined, episodes #23 and #24 make for a super-sized (2+ hours!) brain-bursting, muscle-pumping training for climbing podcast!

Podcast Rundown

0:20 – Intro about how this podcast is actually the second half of Podcast #23—combined they make for 2 hours of instruction on energy system training. A super-sized podcast!

1:50 – The energy system focus remains how to best train up the anaerobic lactic energy system that “bridges” the ATP-CP and aerobic energy systems.

3:25 – A quick recap of the first part (episode #23) on how the anaerobic lactic system works...and the specific adaptations that we’re after.

8:00 – Important: How occlusion of forearm blood flow (during gripping of holds) accelerates intracellular acidification and hastens drop in power output. Thus, the importance of keeping blood flowing to “flush” metabolic byproducts and sustain some degree of aerobic power contribution.

9:25 – Rate of adaptation to training: Anaerobic lactic specific adaptations are relatively fast, whereas many aerobic system specific adaptations take months and years. A quick intro to the aerobic energy system adaptations that enable long-term training adaptations and improved endurance/capacity.

12:30 – A reminder of difference between “anaerobic power” and “anaerobic capacity”…and how you can test yourself for each.

21:00 – A quick disclosure on the variability, flaws, limitations, and validity of many current climbing tests of common performance indicators, such as finger flexor strength, lactic endurance, and aerobic power.

23:55 – Anaerobic capacity training (lactic system specific) protocols—I break into three categories: 1. “high-end” or “short” power endurance (peak power output for 15 to 30 seconds), 2. “intermediate power endurance” (sustained near-maximal power output for 40 to 60 seconds), and 3. “transitional” or “long power endurance” (1 to 3 minutes of moderately-high power climbing/exercise).

25:55 – The importance of the energy system “crossover” that occurs between 45 and 90 seconds, depending on the strength of your anaerobic lactic and aerobic energy systems. For most climbers, this anaerobic-aerobic crossover is likely between 60 and 75 seconds of sustained, high-intensity (no rest, no shake) climbing.

28:45 – How to train “high-end power endurance”. Brief all-out bursts of exercise/climbing with a work-to-rest ratio of at least 1:10. For example, 15 to 30 seconds of very hard exercise/climbing (9.5 to 10 out of 10 effort) followed by 3 to 5 minutes of rest.

33:26 – How to train “intermediate power endurance” for improved mid-range anaerobic capacity (up to one minute of sustained, no-rest, no-shake climbing). The goal is high-intensity exercise/climbing sustained for 40 to 60 seconds at a perceived exertion/intensity of 9 to 9.5 out of 10. This class of anaerobic training is commonly missing from climbers’ training programs—don’t let that be you!

41:50 – Train “long power endurance” (1 to 3 minute anaerobic capacity) with up to 3 minutes of sustained moderately high-intensity exercise or climbing. Perceived exertion should be 8.5 to 9 out of 10 with significant forearm muscle pump/pain and breathlessness. This is classic lactic “tolerance” training—it builds both mental and physical tolerance to the fatiguing byproducts of long-duration power climbing.

45:30 – A word of caution about training “long power endurance” too often or at too high a volume. Especially in-season, this type of training can lead to diminished performance among route climbers who climb outside for performance a few days per week. Overtraining syndrome warning: If you sense you’re getting weaker or losing power, despite immense training/climbing effort, this may be why.

52:35 – Final tips for applying this powerful information. Learn how to prioritize and schedule your training. And always remember that “the best training program for you is one you’re not doing!”

57:20 – Listen to this and the previous podcast several times—there’s a lot of powerful information to assimilate and learn to apply correctly.

58:05 – PLEASE WRITE A REVIEW of this podcast on iTunes…and SHARE with your friends!

58:40 - Visit TrainingForClimbing.com to sign-up for a monthly training newsletter and to get a FREE training-for-climbing eBOOK! Leave a question for the upcoming “Ask Coach Horst” podcast at my Twitter account @Train4Climbing

59:20 – Learn about the new ULTIMATE Hangboard! Need a fingerboard for home training? Consider this one, which I designed for optimal finger flexor crimp and pocket training. Learn more at TrainingForClimbing.com or Nicros.com

PLEASE SHARE THIS PODCAST with your friends via Social Media or an embed on your climbing blog. Thank you!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

May 6, 2018

This is the second in a five-part series on energy system training as a conceptual model for organizing your workouts to obtain better results in the long-term. This episode (and the next) focus specifically on the Anaerobic Lactic energy system and how to best train for adaptations that will increase your anaerobic capacity.

This is a cutting-edge topic with huge potential, especially for advanced and elite climbers, to open up new levels of strength, power, and endurance. By thoughtfully and accurately applying my energy system training guidelines, you will be able to train more effectively and, hopefully, obtain gradual training gains for seasons and years to come!

Podcast Rundown

0:20 – Introduction & comments on why the energy system training conceptual model is valuable...especially to advance and elite climbers.

3:17 – "Thank yous" for all the feedback on the first Energy System podcast. My offer to answer YOUR questions via the next “Ask Coach Hörst” podcast…coming in late May. Submit your question on Twitter @Train4climbing and please include your name, home town, and years climbing. Keep your question short and focused.

5:40 – A first look at the anaerobic lactate energy system...and what we're going drill down into over the next 50+ minutes.

8:00 - Warning about old information and bad advice (and questionable training protocols) that are widespread in the public domain, regarding energy system training. Climbing is a novel activity and in this podcast I am presenting a climbing-specific breakdown of energy system training that may be much different than what you've read or heard for other sports...or other coaches. The science has changed somewhat in recent years...

9:37 - Example: "Lactic acid"...a commonly used term by many laypersons, as well as many athletes, coaches, and even some academics not on top of the latest research on bioenergetics. Listen and learn! Lactate anions and protons (H+) are 99% dissociated at human physiological pH...so talk about "lactate" and "proton" (or acidosis), but NOT "lactic acid"!

13:20 - The 3 parts of this podcast: 1. a review of the three energy systems, 2. an in-depth look at the strengths & weaknesses of the Anaerobic Lactic energy system, 3. a detailed presentation of numerous training strategies & protocols for increasing anaerobic capacity (due to length, this third section is in a separate podcast (#24).

14:50 - Part 1: Overview of the 3 energy systems..and how they overlap and interact.

15:48 - It's all about synthesizing and breaking down ATP to power muscle contraction (and relaxation). Did you know you breakdown your body weight in ATP each day? True story!

18:40 - Review of the ATP-CP system...the source of anaerobic power (highest rate of ATP production & splitting).

21:25 - Teaser on the Anaerobic Lactic energy system.

26:16 - Teaser on the Aerobic energy energy system...the pathway by which ATP can be generated for sustained exercise beyond ~2 minutes, although only at about one-third the power output of the Anaerobic Lactic energy pathway.

29:10 - The unique nature of climbing makes understanding the constant interplay of the 3 energy systems difficult to grasp...and even harder to properly train.

30:10 - For example, frequent occlusion of blood flow to the finger flexor muscles forces a high dependence on anaerobic energy production...and, thus, makes rapid fatigue (drop in power output) a common problem. You can help reduce this dependence by climbing faster and reducing the length of time you grip small/difficult hand holds.

33:00 - A bit on developing climbing research...and about this summer's International Rock Climbing Researches Association (IRCRA) conference in Chamonix France this summer.

34:02 - Drill down into how the Anaerobic Lactic system works. The three energy systems overlap, but it's the Lactic system dominates in sustained near-all-out exercise lasting 15 seconds to about 1 or 2 minutes.

36:25 - About the byproducts of anaerobic glycolysis...and how the limit this energy pathway and your capacity to produce ATP via the anaerobic pathway. Details on the source of fatigue and the training adaptations that you are after.

40:10 - Learn how lactate forms...and how lactate is actually a good thing (NOT a bad thing, per the common belief).

42:45 - Learn one of the secrets of Adam Ondra's climbing prowess. Details on my IRCRA conference presentation...breaking down Adam Ondra's ascent of Silence (5.15d) and Margo Hayes' ascent of Biography (5.15a).

44:20 - The drop in power output from 45 seconds to 75 seconds of sustained difficult climbing is profound...as the lactic system begins to fail and the oxidative system becomes the primary source of ATP production around 60 to 75 seconds into near-all-out activity.

46:30 - The importance of lactate, anaerobic enzymes, and lactate transporters to enable continued anaerobic lactic energy system production...and increase anaerobic capacity.

49:20 - Learn what happens to all the lactate created in your climbing muscles.

51:30 - Importance of training up all 3 energy systems...and trying to "keep all 3 balls in the air" from a performance perspective.

53:00 - Why it's helpful to learn about bioenergetics and sports science--it will empower you to train smarter!

54:45 - Final point: Think of anaerobic power as maximum rate of ATP product (in a 5 second burst)...and view anaerobic capacity as the volume of ATP you can generate in a given period of high-power anaerobic exercise/climbing (say, in 45 seconds or a minute of all-out climbing).

55:28 - Wrap of this part of the Anaerobic Lactic system podcast--breaking this stemwinder of a podcast into two Parts...the next will be released just a few days after this one and it will cover training protocols for developing a greater anaerobic capacity. So tune into Podcast #24 for that important information!

56:00 – Final send off - PLEASE SHARE the T4C Podcast!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Apr 12, 2018

As a change-up to my typical long-format, single-topic drill down podcast, I present to you the first episode of "Ask Coach Hörst"! Listen in as I answer 10 listener questions covering a wide range of topics from in-season fingerboard training, training for big wall stamina, training to excel at climbing AND another sport, and much more. Each question & answer runs about 5 minutes.

If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment the pinned post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, and years climbing.

1:06 - Question #1. A student climber (5.13b) with access to a small university gym (45 degree wall & campus board only) wants to know about doing weighted hangboard training on a portable hangboard...and the pros/cons of training two consecutive days?

6:29 - Question #2. SoCal climber asks how to do hangboard training for "gains" when there's year-round outdoor climbing...that is, no poor-weather off-season to do targeted training.

13:07 - Question #3. A climber with no access to a commercial climbing gym inquires how to train route endurance while only having a hangboard and campus board for home training?

19:20 - Question #4. How to best ramp up training for big wall stamina this summer season?

22:20 - Question #5. How to integrate a progressive overload hangboard training program with outdoor climbing for performance?

24:24 - Question #6. How much aerobic cross-training is too much...that is, what volume of aerobic training would it take to begin hindering climbing performance?

31:15 - Question #7. What to do during rest breaks between fingerboard or pull-up sets? Also, what about during rest periods between redpoint attempts?

37:47 - Question #8. How long does the "just go climbing approach" to improving climbing performance apply? At what point should a climber delve more deeply into intensive strength and power training?

42:00 - Question #9. How to best train for both rock climbing and mountain climbing?

45:42 - Question #10: Advice on how to advance from 6c to 7a and, hopefully, 7a+ (5.12a) while also playing (and training for) rugby? How to best train for both sports at a body weight of 80kg?

52:10 - Wrap up...How YOU can submit a question for the next episode of "Ask Coach Horst". Visit my Twitter @Train4Climbing and leave a comment to the pinned "Ask Coach Horst" podcast.

53:00 - Teaser on the next episode of the T4C podcast on...Energy System Training Part #2. Don't miss this episode on how to train more effectively!

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Mar 26, 2018

This is the first of a two-part FIVE-part in-depth look at energy system training as a conceptual model for organizing your workouts to obtain better results in the long-term. This is a cutting-edge topic with huge potential, especially for advanced and elite climbers, to open up new levels of strength, power, and endurance. By thoughtfully and accurately applying my energy system training guidelines, you will better target individual energy systems to improve cellular signaling and reduce inferring/conflicting signals. This episode focuses on the alactic system that fuels high-powers and the important--and novel--adaptations in the muscle cells, extracellular matrix & fascia, nervous system, tendons, and cardiovascular system. It’s a rich topic that will take a couple podcasts (or more) to unwind and learn to effectively apply to climbing. Let's get started!

Podcast Rundown

0:20 – Introduction

1:15 – Mission statement of the Training For Climbing Podcast

7:40 – Request for you to SHARE this podcast!

8:20 – Introducing the “Ask Coach Hörst” special edition of the Training For Climbing podcast…coming in April. Submit your question on Twitter @Train4climbing and please include your name, home town, and years climbing.

9:55 – Overview of the 3 energy system: Anaerobic Alactic (ATP-CP), Anaerobic Lactic, Aerobic

14:20 – Anaerobic Alactic (ATP-CP) System

16:00 – How the Aerobic energy system supports the Alactic system

17:52 – Anaerobic Lactic System (Anaerobic Glycolysis)

20:37 – Aerobic/Oxidative energy system

21:50 – Bertuzzi study of climbers’ relative energy system utilization

24:02 - A deep drill down look at the Alactic energy system

26:30 – Biochemistry of the ATP-CP system. The Löhmann Reaction.

33:22 – Is consuming supplemental creatine (to load intracellular CP) a good thing for climbers?

40:50 – Adaptations of Alactic Training

45:00 – 1. Neural adaptations – What are they? How do you trigger then with training?

48:20 – 2. Architectural adaptations - What are they? How do you properly train them?

54:25 – 3. Tendon remodeling – What is it…and how it can increase force output and power?

59:15 – Alactic system exercise training protocols. How often should you specifically train this energy system?

1:01:00 – Four climbing-specific exercises that can produce Alactic system-related adaptations and increase muscle efficiency.

1:09:22 – Learn the 1st Rule of Eric’s “Train Club”

1:10:42 – Suggested work-to-rest ratio for Alactic training

1:14:00 – Programming alactic focused workouts

1:15:20 – Special Announcement! “The Ultimate Hangboard”

1:16:54 – Final send off - PLEASE SHARE the T4C Podcast!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Feb 18, 2018

This episode covers a lot of territory…beginning with a look at the very unique Hörst family winter training program. Next up, is a deep look into using autoregulation to adjust your daily training for optimal results. The podcast wraps up with a look at the benefits (or not?) of running as part of a training-for-climbing program.

Podcast Rundown

0:15 Podcast introduction on the 3 main topics: Horst training, autoregulation, and running.

2:00 Eric’s announces winners of T4C raffle…the winners are Mike Ramos (USA) and Harry Crews (South Africa)

3:32 Details on how to get a free download of the eBook “10 Must-Do Exercises for Climbers”, and what you can learn from this free book.

6:18 Part 1 – How does the Horst family train in the winter? It’s a question I’m often asked…and so I’ll give you an indepth description of our home gym, our winter workouts, and how we prepare for the outdoor climbing Spring and Summer seasons.

11:00 Disclaimer….your training program should not be modeled after ours--but you certainly can gain lots of useful insight and ideas.

12:15 About the Hörst boys as multi-sport athletes, and how that effects our training for climbing.

18:15 Our winter Mesocycle details for December, January, and February. We employ a very polarized approach for December and January—the focus is maximum strength/power and aerobic development. Listen in for details…

25:12 Then in February we shift gears to a pre-season focus on strength/power endurance training.

30:30 Important considerations for teenagers—and the rest of us—on sleep and nutrition!

32:48 Part 2 - Autoregulation. What it is, and what are the benefits? Learn how to use it to optimize your training and get better results.

38:20 Details of our standard warm-up protocol…which also provides the basis for our autoregulation.

45:00 How you can employ autoregulation in the gym—what adjustments to make and when.

52:15 Part 3 – Running as training for climbing—Is it a good thing, a bad thing, or an “it depends” kind of thing?

54:30 Definition of VO2…and how important a high VO2max is for hard climbing. What does the research stay?

1:00:40 – Learn the important difference between climbing-specific aerobic training and generalized aerobic training.

1:02:00 – In terms of running…how often should you run? What speed and distance is best for a climber—sprints, tempo, race pace, or long slow distance runs?

1:08:00 Research on the benefits of a strong generalized aerobic system on climbing performance. If you climb roped routes or participate in bouldering comps, this is must-know stuff!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Dec 31, 2017

I hope you’ll find this New Year’s podcast informative, thought-provoking, and mobilizing! After all, uncommon success comes to people who have big dreams, a clear vision and plan, and a bias for action—these are the keys to success in the climbing world…and the everyday world!

In this podcast I serve up 5 generalized tips for improving your training and climbing-related activities to perform better and achieve more in 2018. Towards the end of the podcast I also serve up 5 tips becoming more productive, positive, and happy in all you do in the days and years ahead. New Years is a great time to re-engineer yourself, redefine your personal mission and goals, and to change habits and your personal MO to become more effective in all you do. Let’s get started!

Podcast Rundown

1:00 - Introduction to “10 tips for the New Year” podcast….and the importance of having a bias for action.

2:00 – Strive to distinguish between high- and low-value activities. Which dominate your time?

3:20 – Key point: When “good enough” is good enough….and when “good enough” equals shitty!

5:20 – This New Years…step back and see the big picture of your life: What’s your primary mission?

6:00 – Develop a strategy…set goals and make a plan of action.

6:45 – Key point: Happiness comes from making progress in important activities or areas of your life (not from things).

7:30 – Surround yourself with likeminded goal-oriented, action-oriented individuals; avoid complainers and naysayers.

8:00 – Overview of the two main parts of this podcast:

PART 1.) 5 tips for more effective training for climbing in the New Year. These tips will be rather generalized—listen to the previous podcast (#18) for specific programming guidelines for your ability. PART 2.) 5 tips to improve your personal effectiveness—how to get more important things done with each minute and hour of every day.

10:30 – Details on book raffle (on January 16th)…learn how to enter. Email a snapshot of your iTunes or Amazon book review to: Horst@TrainingForClimbing.com

12:00 – Part 1: 5 global (big picture) tips for improving the effectiveness of your training—and to become a better climber—in the New Years. Importance of setting process goals (resolutions) for achieving your outcome goals.

14:00 – Tip 1: Climb more often. Becoming a better climber starts here!

17:12 – Tip 2: Train to get stronger. Critical for achieving the higher grades!

24:40 – Tip 3: Do some “smart” endurance training. Key point: Simply climbing until you get pumped, it’s an effective long-term endurance-training strategy. Learn about the continuum of endurance types (and training strategies).

38:20 – Tip 4: Dial in your dietary and recovery habits. Small changes in these areas, integrated over days/weeks/months, can make a majority difference in the climbing performance. Learn how!

48:18 – Tip 5: Commit to twice-weekly antagonist & stabilizer muscle training….which will improve your climbing posture, support more efficient movement, reduce injury risk, and perhaps even feedback to give you a stronger grip! What about free weight training? Learn the best approach to add a few supplement lifts without adding unwanted muscle mass.

55:35 – Closing tips for more effective living in the New Year. Here are 5 tips—or habits to change and/or develop--to get more important things done each day, improve your personal effectiveness, increase the rate of progress toward your goals, and experience more happiness day in and day out! Consider adopting a few of these as your New Year’s Resolutions!

58:20 – Resolution #1: TURN OFF notifications on your smartphone—these will rob you of deep concentration and the important flow state….and steal your effectiveness and your destiny! Don’t be a slave to your phone—be its master.

1:01:45 – Resolution #2: Limit time spent on low-value entertainment and “time killing” activities like surfing the Internet, viewing social media Apps, watching TV or movies. While it’s okay to spend a small amount of time each day relaxing with these activities, they can quickly consume many hours of your life…and rob you of real life, real action, real relationships, etc.

1:04:50 – Resolution #3: Develop good sleep habits…which begins with limiting exposure to blue light in the hours before bed. Avoid use of electronic devices before bed OR wear blue blocker glasses (my approach) which are available for ~$25 from Amazon.com.

1:07:25 – Resolution #4: Reduce needless conflict in your life and steer clear of toxic people (both in person and on social media). Strive to be a compulsive doer…and avoid criticism and negatively. Work, recreate, and communicate with doers….and avoid critical, negative, toxic people.

1:12:00 – Resolution #5: Don’t compare yourself to other people—instead find your own unique personal journey!

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Nov 29, 2017

Learn a proven and effective approach to off-season training, broken down for beginner-, intermediate-, and advanced/pro-level climbers. Eric discusses how to handle nagging injuries, refresh motivation, and develop an winter-season training strategy to climbing your hardest next year!

Podcast Rundown

1:00 - Podcast introduction including a discussion of new projects and my T4C YouTube channel.

2:00 - Brief intro to Jerry Moffatt's MasterMind...the best-selling Gimme Kraft, and Claudia Ziegler's "The Young Savages" book (featuring Adam Ondra, Shauna Coxsey, and more!)

5:50 - T4C Raffle! Eric explains how you can win a free copy of The Young Savages or a signed copy of Training For Climbing (3rd edition)

7:43 - Introduction to...End-of-season & off-season training strategy.

11:40 - Step #1: Take 2 weeks off from training and climbing, then evaluate your physical health. If still experiencing any joint or muscles pain, then get it resolved--see a doctor or physio. Do NOT try to "climb through" your injury! Learn how to "train around" it.

19:40 - Step #2: Begin an intelligent, well-designed and executed off-season training program that addresses technical & mental weaknesses and physical constraints. Program recommendations will be served up for beginner, intermediate and advanced-level climbers.

22:08 - The best off-season training approach for beginner climbers is....

27:52 - Eric explains his "training target" analogy.

28:15 - Intermediate program recommendations

37:00 - The importance of training the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizer muscles--not just for injured climbers!

38:06 - Learn how the brain acts as a governor limiting your grip strength in body positions that severely stress the shoulder joint. Yes, a stronger rotator cuff = stronger fingers! Specific exercise guidelines are found in chapter 6 of Training for Climbing.

41:32 - Advanced/Pro-level off-season training tips. Physical testing and expert coaching is essential to hit the bull's eye of your training target--vital for opening up the next grade.

48:00 - Importance of seeing the big picture (and mission), while nailing the critical training details (the bull's eye!).

49:10 - Warning about training too much, thus exceeding your recovery ability...and getting lackluster results...and risking injury.

51:30 - Wrap up and closing comments.

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Follow Eric on Facebook!

Music by: Misty Murphy

Oct 25, 2017

If you occasionally struggle with the fear of falling, then this podcast is for you!

While the fear of falling is most acute among beginner and intermediate climbers, it's a fact that advanced climbers and the pros also experience a bit of falling fear from time to time. After all, fear is an important self-protective response—the goal, then, isn’t to eliminate fear, but to manage it…which is the focus of this podcast.

My Lithuanian friends, Dei and Ben, have created a series of excellent YouTube videos (called “Day in Nature“) with the common theme of exploring the fear of falling. I was happy to join Dei and Ben (and their YouTube channel viewers) for this online coaching session, in which I answer their fear-related questions and share a variety of mental training tips to better manage fear and advance their climbing ability. No matter if you're an indoor climber, boulderer, or sport climber, I trust you'll find some useful tips and techniques to address your unique vertical-world concerns and fearful experiences.

Ultimately, learning to expertly manage fear is a long-term endeavor—there are no quick fixes—and so I hope this hour-plus-long podcast will help kick-start your journey to becoming a more confident, in-control, and courageous climber!

Podcast Rundown:

1:07 - Introducing Jerry Moffatt's MASTERMIND!

2:04 - Eric's intro to coaching the fear of falling.

3:45 - Beginning discussion with Dei & Ben of "Day in Nature"

5:00 – The goal of controlling fear rather than letting fear control you!

10:00 - Legitimate fears vs. phantom fears.

11:30 - The importance of taking practice falls (in a very safe, controlled setting).

13:40 - How to combat fears of the rope getting cut...or a bolt pulling out.

18:45 - Developing the skill of managing fear is a long-term process....that takes effort over months & years.

19:30 - Why do some people conquer fear faster than others?

22:30 - A look inside Alex Honnold's brain (via MRI)...and his "quiet" amygdala.

27:23 - How to handle fear of runouts between bolts?

31:24 - Value of reading books on mental training (such as Warriors Way, Maximum Climbing, MasterMind).

37:00 - Mental training should be comprehensive...and not just focused on managing fear. This is a rich area with potential for huge breakthroughs in performance!

38:12 - Mental training literally changes your brain (neuroplasticity).

38:30 - Using breath-focused meditation as training (at home) and for performance (at the crag).

40:50 - For expertly skilled climbers, further improvement often comes down to mental training...and getting stronger!

41:15 - What about grabbing the rope (or quick draws) when falling?

43:10 - Tips for returning to climbing after an injurious fall.

48:45 - Why are children often less scared of falling than adults?

53:10 - What about fear when clipping the second bolt of a route?

56:23 - How to assess a fall…determining a "safe fall" vs. a dangerous fall situation?

59:55 - What about climbers who never fall (because they climb so far below their maximum ability)? How much harder might they be able to climb by becoming willing/able to fall?

1:03:50 - Who was the most fearful that I've ever coached or climbed with?

1:06:00 - The difference between Anxiety vs. Fear.

1:07:01 - The importance of "mete-cognition"...for improving your mental game and performance (in anything).

1:08:45 - Recognizing and breaking fear "triggers".

1:10:16 - Just as you train your muscles with exercises...it's essential to use mental training exercise to strengthen your mental muscle!

1:12:20 - My two favorite mental training exercises are....

1:14:44 - How to do effective visualization? (Hint: It must be more than just a mental rehearsal of sequence!)

1:16:30 - Closing comments by Dei & Ben.

1:17:30 - Eric wraps up podcasts...and asks YOU to share it with a few friends!

Music by Misty Murphy

 

« Previous 1 2 3 Next »