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Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing Podcast

Training and performance podcasts by Eric Hörst, the internationally renowned author, climbing coach, researcher, inventor, and accomplished climber of more than 40 years. Founder of TrainingForClimbing.com and PhysiVāntage. With his unique combination of veteran climbing and coaching experience and knowledge of the latest climbing research, Eric presents practical, effective guidelines to climb harder, reduce injury risk, and maximize the experience of moving over stone. Eric is one of the world's most knowledgeable climbing coaches and his eight books (and many foreign translations) have sold more than 400,000 copies worldwide. His latest book release is the 3rd edition of Training For Climbing. Learn more at: http://www.trainingforclimbing.com
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Eric Hörst's Training For Climbing Podcast
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Now displaying: Category: Podcasts
Aug 6, 2019

In this episode of Ask Coach Hörst...Eric answers 7 wide-ranging questions from listeners. Some of the topics covered are...energy system training for alactic power, climbing-specific aerobic energy system training, Tabata training on a hangboard, advice for a beginner wanting to hangboard train, the pros/cons of Ketogenic diet, accelerating healing of an A2 pulley injury. Listen in!

Podcast Rundown

4:57 - Question #1 - How important is a climbing-specific aerobic training block at the beginning of a training cycle?

9:42 - Question #2 - Can you provide me with tips on staying healthy and motivated...and supporting my longevity in climbing?

16:12 - Question #3 - How many exercises can I include in an alactic energy system training session for developing maximum strength and power?

22:30 - Question #4 - I've read about the Tabata training protocol and I'm wondering what you think of applying it to hangboard training...by alternating 20-second hangs with 10 seconds of rest?

27:50 - Question #5 - I'm new to climbing and I feel that my weak fingers are a limiting constraint. Do you agree with the common rule of "no hangboard training in the first year of learning to climb"?

32:44  - Question #6 - I've been on a ketogenic diet for the past 3 weeks, and I feel terrific! What's your opinion the ketogenic diet and what are the pros and cons for a climber?

42:05 - Question #7 - I recently injured (mild pain) both of my middle fingers on a tweaky move. I've been doing light stretching and very light exercise to help support healing--what other things can I do to accelerate the healing process?

NOTE: If you'd like to submit a question for the next, please leave it as a comment to the Ask Coach Horst post on my Twitter @Train4Climbing -- include your first name, location, climbing ability level, and years climbing.

Music by Misty Murphy

Follow Eric on Twitter @Train4Climbing

Check out Eric’s YouTube channel.

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And on Instagram at: Training4Climbing

May 1, 2017

A question I'm often asked is how much time—or attempts—should  you put into a project route, before taking a break and working on other climbs. My short answer (with a few caveats) is that it’s best not to get bogged down by long-haul projects—you will improve as a climber faster by sending lots of routes just below your limit, rather than hanging all over (and repeatedly falling off) a single project route that's beyond your limit.

In this podcast I'll detail my "10-4 Rule" of projecting, which gives guidelines and solid reasoning to keep your projecting efforts brief...to around 10 attempts over 4 days. (Personally, I halve these amounts and, thus, limit myself to a total of about five attempts over two days.)

Podcast rundown:

00:55 - Introduction: How much time should you spend projecting limit routes?

3:12 - The "10-4 Rule" for effective projecting and steady improvement

12:55 - Caveats: When to break the 10-4 Rule

16:20 - Bonus: The "80-20" guideline for outdoor climbing time

20:48 - Ask Eric!

21:22 - Can someone who gets into climbing as a young adult progress to climb at a world-class level?

27:00 - "Last minute" training advice for a slightly out-of-shape route climber going on a climbing trip in one week?

29:50 - Final remarks.

Apr 1, 2017

Podcast #11

Training: The Past, The Present, The Future

This episode is more of a free-form podcast rather than  single-topic focused, as in the previous podcasts. I hope you enjoy it!

00:15 - Introduction to Podcast #11

00:46 – The breakthrough climbing achievement of the year….Margo Hayes ascent of La Rambla, the first consensus 5.15a redpoint by a female.

3:05 – Similarities between Margo Hayes and Alex Megos – Smart training with a long-term perspective.

6:55 – Feature topic: Training for climbing….the past, the present, and the future.

9:25 – Comments on Eric’s 40th anniversary in climbing…and 30 years as a coach, researcher, and author. Insight into Eric’s sources of inspiration…and quest for innovation in training for climbing.  

11:10 - Training for climbing….The Past: John Gill – The Father of Training for Climbing. Did you know he climbed V9/5.13+ moves in the 1960s!

16:10 – Training for climbing….The Present: The training information glut of 2017. But can you distinguish the good from the bad (advice)?

19:45 – Training for climbing….The Future: I predict a revolution! New testing and training technologies, more effective training protocols and programming, and the path to 5.16a!

27:25 – Question & Answer: “Ask Eric”

27:38 – Question 1: How do I determine my optimal body weight…in the quest of gaining a higher relative peak finger force (strength-to-weight ratio)

28:00 – Question 2: What do you think of one-arm hangboard training…with the free hand gripping a helper sling?

37:10 – How to submit a training question to Eric

38:20 – Closing comments

Music: Misty Murphy

Photo: Bruce Wilson

Download all the monthly training podcasts for free by subscribing to the "Eric Horst's Training for Climbing" podcast on iTunes. Please leave a review on iTunes!

Feb 2, 2017

While climbing is, first and foremost, a mental and technical skill sport, long-term improvement—and pursuing your genetic potential—demands getting stronger in a number of climbing specific ways. Numerous research studies have confirmed that elite climbers, compared with non-elites, have higher grip-strength-to-mass ratio, greater forearm endurance, and a higher rate of force development in the finger flexors. Therefore, assuming that you have solid technical and mental skills, training for stronger fingers is paramount to taking your climbing to the next level. In this episode you'll learn 5 reason why strong fingers matter--this will set the stage for the next podcast which will cover effective fingerboard training techniques.

0:15 - Intro
1:00 - Research on Finger Strength of Elite Climbers

1:42 - Reason #1 Why Strong Fingers Matter - They Can Grip Smaller Holds

3:00 - #2: Stronger Fingers Can Endure Longer

9:10 - About Zlagboard

11:55 - #3: Strong Finger Can Rest on Smaller Holds

15:25 - #4: Strong Fingers Have More Stamina

18:15 - #5: Strong Fingers Make Climbing More Fun!

18:50 - Summary

20:10 - Closing Comments

Tune in next month for detailed coverage of effective fingerboard training for stronger fingers!

Music: Misty Murphy

Download all the monthly training podcasts for free by subscribing to the "Eric Horst's Training for Climbing" podcast on iTunes. Please leave a review on iTunes!

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